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High Standard Sentinel Revolvers
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  weaponeer

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Posted: July 12 2010 at 1:24pm | IP Logged Quote weaponeer

High Standard introduced their Sentinel revolver line in 1955, probably at the request of Sears Roebuck, which was a major customer and owned quite a bit of High Standard stock. Sears wanted a low-cost kit gun or “tackle box” revolver to sell under their J.C. Higgins brand.  It was sold by Sears as the J.C. Higgins Model 88.  The J.C. Higgins guns were given distinctive grips, cylinder flutes, and cylinder release pins. Private label versions of the Sentinel were also made for Western Auto and Armamex (Colonel Rex Applegate’s company in Mexico).

The Sentinel was a 9-shot .22 revolver.  It was advertised to have an anodized aluminum frame, a high-tensile carbon steel barrel and cylinder, single-stroke multiple ejection, a swing-out counterbored cylinder, a movable square-notched rear sight, a non-slip scored trigger, a diamond-checkered grip (though they didn’t mention it was plastic), and target accuracy.

The innovative design was completed by Harry Sefried, High Standard’s young design engineer, in a mere six months. Sefried wasn’t afraid to incorporate good ideas wherever he found them.  The squared-off grip on the first model was modified from the Colt New Model .36 Pocket Pistol of 1862, and one shooter was said to remark that it was “the first decent grip on a revolver since the Civil War.”  It remains to this day one of the most comfortable revolver grips I have ever encountered.  The simplified cylinder lock design was taken from Hugo Borchardt’s experimental revolver of 1876, which he designed while working for Winchester and which was observed by Sefried during his own five years at Winchester.  The gun, like the Broomhandle Mauser, is screwless but for the grip screw.

There is an integral thumb rest molded into the frame behind the cylinder housing on each side, making the gun feel quite natural in the hand. The grip section and frame are die cast from aluminum. There is no cylinder thumb release to interrupt the smooth frame or complicate manufacture and assembly. The gun can be broken down into four main component groups: (1) the cylinder and crane, (2) the trigger-guard/grip, (3) the barrel and frame assembly, and (4) the hammer, trigger, and other lockwork components.  Everything is held together by the hammer pin, which runs through both the trigger-guard/grip and the main frame. Coil springs are used throughout.

Sefried designed a unique ratchet mechanism that utilizes nine holes drilled into the rear of the extractor, worked by a traditional pawl that extends from the frame.  The holes give the pawl a positive interface, providing flawless cylinder rotation and reducing the machining necessary on the frame and cylinder. The design also reduces wear to the ratchet mechanism that eventually causes problems with more traditional designs. The Sentinel has an extended forcing cone that nearly eliminates lead shaving as the bullet enters the barrel.  I hate it when a revolver spits hot lead out the side when I’m standing next to the shooter--it could be a fatal distraction in a fire fight.

The Sentinel was originally available in a blued finish (which actually looked more black than blue).  The nickel finish was available in April of 1956. The early nickeled guns cost $5 or $6 more than the blued guns.  The MSRP for the blued gun in 1955 was $37.50.  The Sentinel had a one-piece wrap-around plastic grip.  Originally the blue guns had a brown grip and the nickel guns had a white grip, but that scheme was not retained throughout production.
 

A 1955 catalog says the gun was available with a 3 or a 5 inch barrel. A parts list circa 1957 or 1958 shows 3 inch, 4 inch, and 2-3/8 inch barrels were available.  By 1956, a 6 inch barrel was also available. The 3 inch barrel was dropped in 1964.

In 1957 a snub-nose model of the Sentinel was introduced, with a rounded butt on the grip. The early guns had a bobbed hammer, through about 1960, after which they featured a spur hammer. Color finishes in gold, turquoise, and pink, known as Dura-Tone colors, were offered for the snub-barrel Sentinels. The Dura-Tone guns came in a deluxe presentation case and had white smooth grips.

In 1958 a line of western-style revolvers was spun off the Sentinel line, the first model of which was called the Double-Nine.  It was sold by Sears as the J.C. Higgins Ranger Model 90.

Sentinel Series Numbers

• R-100. The first Sentinel series was called the R-100.
• R-101. In mid-1956, the hammer and trigger mechanisms were slightly modified for the R-101 series.
• R-102. In 1961, for the R-102 series, a return spring was added to the ejector rod.  On the earlier models, if you didn’t remember to manually retract the ejector into the cylinder before closing you would put a nasty scratch on the left side of the frame.
• R-103. The R-103 series had slots milled into the ejector instead of drilled holes.
• R-104. In 1961 the R-104 Sentinel Imperial was issued with two-piece checkered walnut grips, a ramp front sight, and a target-style trigger.  (The regular Sentinel was still available with one-piece plastic grips and blade front sight, and it retained the old R-103 designation.)
• R-105. These guns were originally made for Sears, but were returned to High Standard when Sears dropped their handgun line in 1963, and were rebranded as High Standard guns (the barrels and grips were replaced).  They retain the distinctive cylinder flutes, cylinder pin, trigger guard, and one-piece grip design of the J.C. Higgins guns. As best I can tell, this is one of the least common Sentinels.
• R-106. In April 1965 the Sentinel Deluxe appeared, with the R-106 series number. The ramp front sight was replaced with a blade, but the gun retained the checkered walnut grips of the Imperial.  The old Imperial continued in production.
• R-107. This was also a Sentinel Deluxe. I have been unable to determine the difference between the R-106 and R-107. Externally they appear to be identical, but the part numbers for the frame, grip, trigger, and hammer were all changed..
• R-108. In 1967 the Snub-nose Sentinel was given a two-piece grip and the R-108 series designation.
• R-109. The Kit Gun was introduced and given the R-109 series designation. This was the first model with a fully adjustable rear sight.
• MK I and MK IV.  In 1974 the series numbers were eliminated and the Sentinel MK I and MK IV were introduced.  These guns had optional adjustable rear sights, wrap-around walnut grips, and the first steel frames to appear in the Sentinel line.  The MK I was chambered for the .22 long rifle, and the MK IV was chambered for the .22 Winchester magnum.  The MK I and MK IV were available with 2 inch, 3 inch, or 4 inch barrels. The Camp Gun was introduced in this same period. It was similar to the MK I and MK IV, but did not have the barrel underlug which shrouded the ejector rod. The Camp Gun came with a standard 6 inch barrel and adjustable sights, and was available in either .22 long rifle or .22 magnum.
• Steel Sentinel.  At some point the Mark I and Mark IV designations were dropped and the steel frame gun was sold as the “Sentinel” with interchangeable .22 LR and .22 magnum cylinders.
• MK II and MK III.  These were rebranded Dan Wesson .357 Magnum revolvers.  They were sold from mid-1973 through February of 1975.

The Sentinel MKII is essentially a Dan Wesson built Model 15-2 (the same Pistol sold in the Pistol Packs, but without the other barrel selections), but with the High Standard Sentinel MKII name on it.

The Sentinel MKII is a Dan Wesson Medium Frame Revolver and grips designed to fit the Dan Wesson will fit the Sentinel MKII. The barrel and shroud are removable and replaceable and they were available from approx 1973 to 1975. You should use the Dan Wesson tool to adjust the barrel gap on the pistol from time to time.

The pistol below is the High Standard Sentinel MKII, and I bought it at a gun show in the early 80’s.  it originally had a very ugly target grip, and at one point in its life it had been dropped and slightly dented the shroud (actually it looked more like a bullet impact), so it looked a little rough and I only paid $50 for it. I replaced the grip to a better grip and used it for hunting for years as a backup. Then I changed out the grip again, and this time I refinished the whole pistol in a nice packetized finish for a nice combat look and to hide the old damage and it turned into a very nice 357 Mag Pistol suitable as a CCW, as while being a med frame, it’s really not that hard to conceal if needed due to the barrel length, and giving you the option of high end 357 magnum ammunition, or lower end 38 Spec. +P.

I have owned this pistol now for 27 years.  It’s nice to own a Dan Wesson Revolver even if it has another companies name on it.

 

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  weaponeer

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Posted: July 12 2010 at 1:26pm | IP Logged Quote weaponeer

The High Standard Sentinel MKII

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Posted: July 13 2010 at 9:06am | IP Logged Quote tr6guns

I have the Model 104, the Hombre which was my dads that he took with him for years when he went stream trout fishing in Wisconsin.
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  dcorb

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Posted: July 13 2010 at 10:16am | IP Logged Quote dcorb

Only in Wisconsin:

trout fishing with a revolver 

 

 

just kidding.

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Posted: July 13 2010 at 11:07am | IP Logged Quote tr6guns

He also took a fly rod, but he may have been shooting them. Hell of a sport..
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  kilogulf59

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Posted: July 18 2010 at 1:02pm | IP Logged Quote kilogulf59

Interesting….
 
I have been looking for a “decent” High Standard or J. C. Higgins .22 revolver for some time. Anyone have a clue?
 
I made The High Standard Sentinel Revolver by Ed Buffaloe into a PDF if anyone’s interested. Email me and I’ll send you a copy.
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  smt57

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Posted: July 18 2010 at 10:59pm | IP Logged Quote smt57

I would like to have a set of the white plastic grips that came on some of the High Standard Sentinels
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